Babi Yar

Babi Yar Memorial

The Babi Yar memorial monument and surrounding park are a grim reminder of one of the biggest single massacres of Jews during the Nazi Holocaust committed by German Nazis and Ukrainian collaborators . On September 29th & 30th, 1941,  33,771 Jews were murdered in a ravine on the edge of Ukraine’s capital. Over the next 3 years a further 70,000 people were slaughtered at Babi Yar in the so-called "Holocaust of bullets". These included Jews, Ukrainian resisters, Roma, and disabled people. The memorial park and monuments mark an area of great historical importance, and remember those who suffered under one of history's saddest chapters.

How to get to the Babi Yar Monument Kiev Ukraine

Because this park is on the outskirts of Kiev (Kyiv) it can feel a little remote. The quickest way is by metro. Take the green line M3 from central Kiev to Dorohozhychi station. It is only two stops from the Golden Gate (Zolotoi Vorota) and three from the Palats Sportu. The distances are quite long between stops so it will take about 35 minutes.

 

When you arrive at Dorohozhychi station, either take the southern exit to go to the older Soviet memorial first or take the northern exit and walk straight up the tree-lined boulevard to the Children's monument.
When you reach Babi Yar have in mind the memorials are spread out and are not all in one place.


There are plenty of plaques and information in English so you will be able to take in the full horror of what occurred here.

Babi Yar Ukraine

Babi Yar Memorial Park

When the Nazis invaded the USSR in 1941, the Nazi death camps had not yet been constructed in occupied Poland. Nazi soldiers were ordered to set-up mobile killing squads — called “Einsatzgruppen” . These were then deployed to conduct large-scale shooting massacres of the Jewish community.


Babi Yar or Babyn Yar memorial park as it is known, is set to be the largest holocaust site in the world. Ukraine will build a synagogue, church and mosque at the memorial site in 2021. It is also planned to construct 12 buildings across 370-acres of the filled-in ravine where so many innocent Jews were slaughtered during World War II. 


It may surprise many people that Babi Yar is “Europe’s largest mass grave”. It is intended that the new museum complex will transform the area from a place of terror and killing, into a place of peace and tranquillity.